Wilsoni on Shuffle | Funky Crime – Red Hot Chili Peppers (1987)

I totally forgot about this one – and the lyrics are much more pertinent to my current musical manner than I’d previously figured when we were jammin’ this in High School!


Like many of my generation, I was a big Chilis fan as a teenager. Flea and Stuart Zender helped foster my love of the low-end, and I was pretty slap happy for a few years. I’ve considered myself to have grown out of them now, but then something like this pops up on shuffle and reminds me that when they were the best of Funk and Punk, the Chilis were pretty bad! This tune’s from what I’d consider their definitive record – The Uplift Mofo Party Plan – the only with the full original line up of Anthony Keidis (Vox), Flea (Bass), Hillel Slovak (Guitar) and Jack Irons (Drums), before Slovak died of an overdose and drove Irons to a mental institution. Check out (George Clinton produced) Freaky Styley for Hillel’s gnarly dive-bombs!

Obviously BloodSugarSexMagick is the classic established line up album, and it’s really great. I think they lost a lot of steam after Frusciante cleaned up. But that’s fine, their prerogative.

Don Letts Record Box | John Peel Record Boxes – The Space

In the third of our series of Record Boxes commissioned by The Space, Don Letts tells the unlikely story of how rebels from opposite sides of the globe became bedfellows, inspiring the last true musical counter-culture of our age.

– read the full article @ johnpeelarchive.com


Don Letts. What an absolute legend.

If you’re otherwise uninitiated, let me hit you with the skinny – the BBC and Arts Council England set up a digital commissioning and development organisation called ‘The Space‘. One of the more notable things this fund has curated is digitally archiving the late great John Peel‘s record collection for reference. Which, obviously, is amazing.

In the third edition of the John Peel Record Box series, veteran film-making Rasta-Punk DJ Don Letts takes his picks from the fruit of Peel’s well-kept musical garden and gives some context to the importance of the culture and music of the time. briefly touching on Dub Mixing, British race identity in post-war society and meeting Bob Marley through their “mutual love of a certain plant”. Dig it, and click the link above to read about his full list of picks.